English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages


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Dweck's research challenges the common belief that intelligent people are born smart. Perhaps the most common misconception is simply equating the growth mindset with effort. It is about telling the truth about a student's current achievement and then, together, doing something about it, helping him or her become smarter. Dweck advises, "If parents want to give their children a gift, the best thing they can do is to teach their children to love challenges, be intrigued by mistakes, enjoy effort, and keep on learning.

That way, their children don't have to be slaves of praise.

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They will have a lifelong way to build and repair their own confidence. Dweck warns of the dangers of praising intelligence as it puts children in a fixed mindset, and they will not want to be challenged because they will not want to look stupid or make a mistake. She notes, "Praising children's intelligence harms motivation and it harms performance. Carol Dweck maintains a teaching presence as a psychology professor at Stanford for the school year, teaching Developmental Psychology, Self Theories, and Independent Studies.

Dweck has explained her current focus by saying "I am now developing a broad theory that puts motivation and the formation of mindsets or beliefs at the heart of social and personality development. It is hoped that this will attract even more young scholars in developmental psychology to the study of motivation. Dweck said in a statement, "I'm thrilled and honored to be the inaugural recipient of this amazing prize. It will allow us to take our work forward and continue to innovate—to develop even more effective interventions for students and more effective materials for teachers to use in classrooms.

Critics point to the fact that Dweck's research does not appear to be replicable—a key requirement to prove its validity.

Writing in the Spectator, Toby Young points out that " Timothy Bates , a psychology professor at the University of Edinburgh , has been trying for several years to replicate Dweck's findings, each time without success, and his colleagues haven't been able to either". Dweck has responded to this criticism by saying that researchers have not accurately replicated the conditions of the study.

However, Nick Brown, who co-developed the GRIM test argued: "If your effect is so fragile that it can only be reproduced [under strictly controlled conditions], then why do you think it can be reproduced by schoolteachers? Tom Chivers, writing for BuzzFeed , comments: "The findings of Dweck's key study have never been replicated in a published paper, which is noteworthy in so high-profile a work.

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One scientist told BuzzFeed News that his attempt to reproduce the findings has so far failed. An investigation found several small but revealing errors in the study that may require a correction".


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Nick Brown applied the GRIM test, a simple statistical test used to identify inconsistencies in the analysis of granular data sets, to the work by Mueller and Dweck, finding inconsistencies. Dweck acknowledged and responded to the highlighted inconsistencies, some of which turned out to be mistakes. Brown praised Dweck's "openness and willingness to address the problems" and said she had done a "thorough job of owning up to the problems" of the paper.

Brown commented: "I'm still skeptical about mindset as a construct, but at least I feel confident that the main people researching it are dedicated to doing the most careful reporting of their science that they can". Other education and psychology researchers worry that 'mindset' has simply become another aspect to be assessed and graded in children.


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  • Matt O'Leary, an education lecturer at Birmingham City University, tweeted that it was "farcical" that his six-year-old daughter was being graded on her attitude towards learning. David James, professor of social sciences at Cardiff and editor of the British Journal of Sociology of Education, says "it's great to dwell on the fact that intelligence is not fundamentally genetic and unchangeable", but he believes the limitations of mindset outweigh its uses. In July , a large randomized controlled trial of growth mindset training by the Education Endowment Foundation involving schools and pupils across England found that pupils in schools receiving the intervention showed no additional progress in literacy or numeracy relative to pupils in the control group, as measured by the national Key Stage 2 tests in reading, grammar, punctuation, and spelling GPS , and maths.

    Carol is married to David Goldman, who is a national theatre director and critic and the founder and director of the National Center for New Plays at Stanford University. She notes the grandchildren have growth mindset and says, "Their parents did very well with that! From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Barnard College. Retrieved Schools Week. Stanford University. Retrieved 10 May A social cognitive neuroscience model".

    Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience. Psychological Science. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology. Psychological Review. American Psychologist. Child Development Perspectives. As well as reading some of our favourite stories we shared some breakfast treats and juice. Lots of adults came and read with us, we shared picture books, chapter books and information books.

    Thank you to all who came. The children discussed whether this was actually the case and whether they had a different fate. The children were set the task to create a play-script to explain what they believe actually happened. This was a difficult task as the children had to work in a large group collaboratively, ensuring that all ideas were listened to and that each person played a part in creating the script.

    Jim the street child and his family are living in a room and their mother is sick and is near to death.

    Their landlord arrives to collect his rent but he is furious when he realises that have spent their last shilling on food. He is so angry that he tells the family to leave immediately. It is snowy outside and they have nowhere to go. What will they do and how will they survive? After each group depicted their scene the class talked about how the groups had effectively shown their emotions through their bodies alone.

    The children used a thesaurus to find different synonyms for the word shake. They then used these words to create their own poems in the style of the book. FM - It was really good fun to write with chalk. SS - It was unusual because we used pink chalk.

    PB - There's loads of space on the playground to write loads of real and alien words.

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    CR - It helped me practise my spelling. OB - I like it because I get to make new friends in Seedlings. JM - I like to see what the Year 1's are reading. HN - It helps me practice my reading.

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    CP - It's good to join the classes together. HM - I like doing it: it's fun. EH - I like helping other people learn to read. Working collaboratively, children from Year 6 and Seedlings class joined together to develop reading and build social skills. At Stanford we promote a love for reading!

    Year 5 have teamed up with Year 6 and Year 3 recently to listen to each other read and discuss our favourite books. We also shared our class novel 'The 1, Year Old Boy' and as a class discussed what we predict might happen next Year 6 had a wonderful World Book Day, dressing up as their favourite literary characters and designing spoons for a competition.

    Children in Key Stage 2 took part in several activities across the different classrooms. In Barley class, the activity was focused on 'Fantastic Beasts', where the children created their own beasts and wrote descriptions about them. Seedlings children visited Stanford Library to learn about the role of a librarian and the parts of a book such as the title, author, illustrator and blurb.

    We listened to a story read by Mrs Wink and then borrowed some books to take back to our class. Of course we had to scan the books and stamp them with the date on which to return the book first! The children were given different time periods throughout the prehistoric period and were asked to create a freeze frame to show how the different prehistoric creatures have interacted with the pebble throughout this time. This term the school are focusing on the work of Michael Rosen, a fantastically, funny poet. He spoke to us about why he decided to be a poet and where he gets his inspiration from.

    He was really funny and we had a lot of fun joining in. After that he went into the classrooms and helped us to write poems. The children listened to a piece of text and thought about the words which painted images in their minds. They read the text and highlighted descriptive phrases and then used these phrases to create a picture of a volcano with one half erupting and the other showing the aftermath.

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    They then annotated their drawings with the phrases that had inspired them. The Sunflowers enjoyed meeting the author Matt Goodfellow today who shared his love for writing poetry with the children.

    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages
    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages
    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages
    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages
    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages
    English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages English Grammar Taught with Help from Stanford: Grammar & Punctuation for All Ages

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