The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)


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Scottish Maritime Warfare, 1513-1713

But it was also the night when Sweden's power culminated. Never again would the country become so close to rule over the entire Nordic region. Thousands of professional soldiers clashed and died at Copenhagen's walls, ramparts and in hand to hand combat, but this was a time when the Nordic history took a new path, Copenhagen could not be taken!

The people showed an unshakable loyalty to the king and their determination to defend Copenhagen to the uttermost.

Together they improved the defensives of the city in record time under the constant supervision of the King, Queen, the Mayor, and the garrison grew to armed men. So strong was the city defenses by this time that Charles X, abandoning his original intention of taking the city by assault, began a regular siege. The walls of Copenhagen bristled with about pieces of cannon, mortars and other artillery, with a diverse mixture of weapons. Craftsmen, students and other civilians were allocated a part of the wall to defend. The professional soldiers were stationed at the outer field works, the Kastellet later a Star Fortress and the Slotsholmen, a tiny Island with a Castle in the harbor of Copenhagen.

The Swedish army consisted of about 10, professional soldiers, while the Danish defenders, a mixture of professionals were of an equal number. Besides Danish soldiers, there were a Dutch mercenary regiment of men, a militia force and raw civilians. But the Swedes were taking severe losses and unable to take their key targets, forcing them to retreat.


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Before the walls bodies were counted, many more had perished in the ice cold water of the defenses, and both the Kastellet, and Slotsholmen held firm. On top of that there were many wounded. The assault had been a complete disaster and the siege was broken, while the Danes had only suffered about thirty dead. In Norway, the army had not been disbanded after the peace treaty. The Northern commander, Jorgen Bielke succeeded in laying siege to Trondheim, which was occupied by the Swedes.

The siege resulted in the recapture of the entire province. On the Danish island Bornholm, the people successfully revolted, killing the Swedish commandant and taking the trip to Copenhagen with the remaining Swedish soldiers as prisoners, demanding to the Danish King Frederick III that Bornholm must never become part of Sweden.

After Nyborg city had been besieged and liberated by a Danish-Dutch force on the Island of Funen Fyn , the Swedes was unable to hold it together and eventually lost the war, resulting in The Treaty of Copenhagen signed in Frederick III profited most by his spirited defense of the common interests of the country and the dynasty. The traditional loyalty of the Danish middle classes was transformed into enthusiasm for the king personally, and for a brief period Frederick found himself the most popular man in his kingdom.

He made use of his popularity by realizing the dream of a lifetime, converting an elective monarchy into an absolute monarchy by the Revolution of Last edited: May 27, The Boss , Apr 22, I think The Boss likes Denmark, yes? Last edited: Apr 22, He was the first Scandinavian King to ever go on crusade to the Holy Land and would not lose a single battle during the crusade! Sigurd had assembled a fleet of some 60 ships and around some men at Bergen in and set sail for the Holy Land that year.

Crossing the North Sea he stopped in England for the winter before heading out in Moving on past France Sigurd came to the coast of Spain and Portugal, where he encountered a great Pirate fleet of galleys which were seeking peaceful trading ships to rob. However, Sigurd set his course straight for the pirates and stormed their ships, acquired eight ships from them.

They arrived to a Castle in Muslim Al-Andalus called Sintra - present day Portugal, taking the Castle and killing all men that would not convert to Christianity. They went on to Lisbon, a "half Christian and half heathen" city, said to be the division between Christian and Muslim Iberia.

There they won their third battle, and acquired great treasures. After another victorious battle against pirates sailing through the Strait of Gibraltar, they raided the coast of Al-Andalus, arriving at the Balearic Islands. The Islands were at the time perceived by Christians to be nothing more than a pirate haven and Muslim slave center. There they attacked successfully Ibiza, and then Minorca, but seems to have avoided attacking the largest of the Islands, Mallorca.

They arrived in Sicily where they were welcomed by the ruling Count Roger II who was only 12—13 years old, where they wintered again. Sigurd finally arrived at the city of Acre in the spring of Sigurd was enthusiastically welcomed and feasted by the ruling Crusader King Baldwin I, conducting him personally to the city of Jerusalem from the coast, and thence to the River Jordan. The Sidonians had summoned a fleet from Fatimid Egypt which had proved too much for the ragtag assembly of Italian ships that had been present in the Holy Land at that time. Baldwin gathered his army that summer set out for Sidon by land.

The fleet set sail for Sidon and was intercepted by a Fatimid flotilla that was sailing down from the city of Tyre further north. Battle was joined and the Norwegians were close to giving way until the arrival of Venetian ships, under the command of the Doge Ordelafo Falieri, arrived to tip the scale back into the Christians favour. The Fatimid ships retreated and the city of Sidon was besieged from both land and sea. The Franks, bolstered by the Norwegians numbers on land and by their ships at sea set in for a long siege.

The city would eventually capitulate and The Patriarch of Jerusalem granted Sigurd a splinter of the True Cross to take back to Norway with him in thanks for his efforts and assistance. He sold his fleet to the Byzantine Emperor Alexius, whom he would regularly meet whilst in Constantinople.

Friday, November 11, 2005

Many of his men took up service with the Emperor, rather than return home. Sigurd having been granted some horses by Alexius made his way home in a trip that supposedly would take around three years, from Bulgaria and through Hungary, Pannonia, Swabia and Bavaria, where he met with the Emperor Lothar of the Holy Roman Empire. He later arrived in Denmark where he was greeted by King Niels who gave him a ship so he could sail home to Norway. He died in and was buried in Hallvard's church in Oslo.

Sigurd however only had a daughter and no legitimate sons. This led to a power struggle following his death between various illegitimate sons and other royal pretenders, which escalated into a lengthy 10 years devastating civil war. And him up. And that guy. Wait, maybe not that guy. Yeah, I did. And the big lunk over there?

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Clobbered him. Clobbered him, I did. I used to be somebody. Will you buy me a round? Awww, come one, just one. I'm barely drunk. I'll take you! I'll bloody bash your face in, I will.

Got no arguments from this little Indian. Not to mention that Britain wasn't Britain at the time, in some cases. For instance, an invasion of Gaul by the Romans who were occupying what is now Britain can hardly be called an example of British aggression. Crash Course: 19th Century Imperialism. In fairness, it generally didn't end well and we mostly feel pretty bad about it. A more telling map would be how many countries the British have gotten drunk in and vomited on. Totally true.

Also, we are using Wales as a place of breeding a Sardaukar-like force of such utter savagery that those remaining 22 nations will crumble like soggy biscuit. Sadly, so far we have only managed to assemble some excellent Welsh male voice choirs, and they have a pretty poor grip of the weirding way. Scotland and Ireland were totally in on the whole invading places thing when not moaning about having been invaded.

Having it both ways, I call it.

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Welshmen were of course historically unable to act as seconds in a duel due to their natural bloodthirst. That and the fact that we were a nation of shit-stirrers without peer. Never field an army if you can persuade someone else to field one for you. Jesus guys, you should have heard what France was saying about you last night!

No way I'd put up with that kind of thing if i were you The process of making and consuming tea is a social and time consuming one. We must wait for the water to boil. For the tea leaves to release their flavour.

For the tea to be poured. For the tea to cool, and be consumed, usually with the addition of a sandwich with the crusts cut off middle class or a biscuit working class or the crusts from the aforementioned sandwiches servants and butlers.

Norway (Eyewitness Travel Guides)

That is a lot of time spent in social contact, based around the process of "having" tea. Inevitably, conversation about even the weather soon runs dry no pun intended. Which is why the conversation, over the centuries, has often turned into countries of the world. Which has the best resources. Which has the better weather. Which haven't we invaded yet. And which may have the ideal growing conditions for tea.

And that, in a nutshell, is why we have invaded most countries and principalities.


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Including the USA. Several times. Yes, I spelt flavour correctly. If you have the temerity to argue about it, then all I'll say is: "Florida is ours I've heard that the food may have also been a factor for a while. Did Napoleon ever set up a puppet state, as he did in Spain?

The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)
The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy) The Battle of Kringen and the Scottish Incursion in 1612 (Norwegian Histoy)

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